Online Journal

Law Review Banner

The Detroit Mercy Law Review Online Journal is currently open for submissions.

We invite essay submissions on current areas of legal thought and research for the Detroit Mercy Law Review Online Journal, our online publication.

Our Law Review publishes short articles written by academics, judges, and practitioners on the Online Journal. It provides pieces on timely issues in our city, state, and nation. Our Online Journal quickly circulates the legal community’s impressions of important judicial decisions and legislative developments.

The Detroit Mercy Law Review Online Journal strongly prefers submissions of between 1,000 and 5,000 words, inclusive of footnotes. Submissions should be written in a style accessible to a general audience of practitioners and policymakers and should comply with the Bluebook system of citations.

Please send pieces for consideration, along with a brief description of the topic and word count, and an updated resume to lawreview@udmercy.edu. For the subject line, please write: “Online Journal Submission [last name].”

The Detroit Mercy Law Online Journal provides articles on timely issues in our city, state and nation.  Below are some of the most recent articles.

 

Recent articles

Anecdotes from A Collaborative Classroom: Teaching the Intersection of Litigation and Transactional Law
By Jay Paskan & Jean Steadman

This article presents the perspectives of two experienced law professors that designed and taught a class focusing on aspects of both litigation and transactional law with the goal of training well-rounded practitioners.

Recommended Citation Jay Paskan & Jean Steadman, Anecdotes from A Collaborative Classroom: Teaching the Intersection of Litigation and Transactional Law, 99 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. Online 1

Establishing Corporate Criminal Liability for Crimes Against Humanity
By Harshit Rai

A pervasive culture of impunity surrounds corporate involvement in grave international crimes. Presently, there is no international mechanism to punish corporations for serious international crimes, as the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court (“ICC”) does not permit holding legal persons criminally liable.

Recommended Citation Harshit Rai, Establishing Corporate Criminal Liability for Crimes Against Humanity, 97:4 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. Online 1

Favoring And Disfavoring Religion In Law
By Sohail Wahedi

This essay discussed the question whether the law should treat religion in a special way because it is religion, either for the purposes of favoring or disfavoring religion in law.

Recommended Citation Sohail Wahedi, Favoring And Disfavoring Religion In Law, 97:4 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. Online 1

“Thinking like a Lawyer: A Back to the Future Proposal for a Practitioner Based and Taught Pedagogy”
By Professor Michael Maslanka

An innocuous title for a radical proposal. A proposal that, to borrow the movie title, will take us Back to The Future. This Article proposes that how we currently teach law students to “think like a lawyer,” if at all, is not working. And I use this definition of “think”: “use one’s mind to actively form connected ideas…to direct one’s mind towards something.”

Recommended Citation Professor Michael Maslanka, “Thinking like a Lawyer: A Back to the Future Proposal for a Practitioner Based and Taught Pedagogy”, 97:4 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. Online 1

Defining Violent Felonies under the Armed Career Criminal Act after Stokeling v. United States
By Bailey D. Barnes

In 2015, Denard Stokeling, the Petitioner, “pleaded guilty to possessing a firearm and ammunition after having been convicted of a felony.” Upon entering the plea, the United States Probation and Pretrial Services Office recommended that the District Court sentence Mr. Stokeling to fifteen years in prison as an armed career criminal under the Armed Career Criminal Act.

Recommended Citation Bailey D. Barnes, Defining Violent Felonies under the Armed Career Criminal Act after Stokeling v. United States, 97:4 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. Online 1

A Law Student Prepares: Bringing Theater into a Law School Curriculum
By Samantha Buck

The importance of integrating theater into law school curriculum.

Recommended Citation Samantha Buck, A Law Student Prepares: Bringing Theater into a Law School Curriculum, 97:1 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. Online 102

Complaint Conflicts: How Michigan’s State Complaint Oversight Fails to Protect Students with Disabilities
By Emily B. Garcia

This article seeks to show how Michigan Department of Education’s complaint procedures are inconsistent with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA) and the Michigan Administrative Rules for Special Education (MARSE), and recommend reforms for improving the system.

Recommended Citation Emily B. Garcia, Complaint Conflicts: How Michigan’s State Complaint Oversight Fails to Protect Students with Disabilities, 97:1 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. Online 102

Women’s Rights in the Workplace: The Struggle Is Still Real
By Kirsten J. Silwanowicz

A look at where women’s rights in the workplace are now.

Recommended Citation Kirsten J. Silwanowicz, Women’s Rights in the Workplace: The Struggle Is Still Real, 97:1 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. Online 102

From English Law and Blackstone to Modern Jurisprudence: A Survey of the Interpretation and Changes to the Bill of Attainder Clause of the U.S. Constitution
By Alina Veneziano

This article traces the history of the Bill of Attainder Clause, including its origins from English law, U.S. case law, and various commentaries and scholarship.

Recommended Citation Alina Veneziano, From English Law and Blackstone to Modern Jurisprudence: A Survey of the Interpretation and Changes to the Bill of Attainder Clause of the U.S. Constitution, 97:2 U. Det. Mercy L. Rev. Online 1

Call for Articles

The University of Detroit Mercy Online Law Journal offers rapid turnaround and publication of shorter length articles (1,000–5,000 words) on any legal topic. Please send your manuscript to lawreview@udmercy.edu.

The subject line should read, “Online Journal Law Review Submission.”